Murrumbidgee Corridor

The Murrumbidgee River Corridor sports a wide array of natural and recreational activities for the Canberra region, allowing visitors to see one of the greatest rivers flowing through the capital. The river rises as it travels through the Snowy Mountains and then merges into the powerful Murray River.

The corridor is made up of the narrow land that borders it as well as the river. The land has been preserved as part of numerous recreation and nature reserves and is considered sacred to many Aboriginal Groups of the area such as the Wiradjuri, Ngunnawal, and the Nari Nari. The corridor can be reached via the suburbs and most areas are open every day 24 hours.

Some of the prime activities of the Murrumbidgee River Corridor include fishing, bushwalking, swimming, canoeing, bird watching, picnicking, and wildlife observation. The recreational areas offer playgrounds, BBQs, and mown areas.

Bushwalking

Walks range in length from half hour strolls to those that can take all day to finish, with all tracks labelled simply with clear signage and track markers. Of special note is the Murrumbidgee Discovery Track, which follows the river from the Point Hut Crossing 27km down to the Casuarina Sands.

Download Murrumbidgee Corridor Walking Trail

Swimming

All swimming areas are clearly marked with the river conditions and recommendations and swimming is at your own risk. If you are looking for sandy beaches head towards Point Hut Crossing, Tharwa Sandwash, Pine Island, Cotter Bend, Kambah Pool, or Uriarra Crossing. Children and adults can both enjoy these swimming areas. 200 metres to the south of the Kambah Pool car pack is a nude bathing area that is clearly marked and highly visited.

Fishing

Fishing is allowed anywhere along the river except between the Angle Crossing junction and the Gigerline Nature Reserve near the Gudgenby River junction. No fishing license is required but only catch and release fishing is allowed and all ACT fishing regulations and bag limits are enforced.

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